• Dharma's Notes on Starcraft

    Star Chart Calculation

    I have tried several different ways of calculating the star chart and have found that the time-based systems seem to work the best.  In fact, the time-based systems have proven incredibly accurate and successful when used with Urania’s code. I currently calculate charts using the Tropical Zodiac and Placidus House system.  And I find that it works for both hemispheres and the poles.

    The star chart is meant to be a code–a precise, accurate, efficient form of communication.  It is not meant to be some abstract ideology to be theorized through the ages.  It is a message that is delivered in exactly the same way for everyone on the planet, regardless of their location.

    As Patrick Watson puts it, “Earth’s northern hemisphere is generally the front seat of our voyage around the Milky Way”.  Our solar system is moving at a northward motion through our galaxy.  Therefore, using the vernal equinox in March as the starting point of the zodiac is logical.

    This leads us to our next quandary.  In calculating the star chart, everything boils down to time and place.  We can always get accurate coordinates for place, but time is much trickier to pinpoint through the ages.  During war times, the practice of timekeeping has historically been erratic and inconsistent with known standards.  In cases where one geographic location was occupied by several different countries, and military forces, timekeeping delved into chaos.  To correctly pinpoint the time of someone born in Vienna in September of 1945, one would need to know which version of time was recorded.  Was it the U.S. version of time, the Russian version of time, the French version of time, or was it the British version of time.  The British were practicing a peculiar version of daylight savings time throughout their empire during the war years, in order to help with rationing resources.  To accurately cast the star chart requires that one knows the method of timekeeping in use at the time of birth and then converting that time to a Julian date that references the hour and second.